Logisticians

job search

What do they do?

Analyze and coordinate the ongoing logistical functions of a firm or organization. Responsible for the entire life cycle of a product, including acquisition, distribution, internal allocation, delivery, and final disposal of resources.

Also known as:

Client Services Administrator, Logistician, Production Planner, Supply Management Specialist

Typical Wages

Annual wages for Logisticians in United States

job search

Projected Growth Rate

Employment of Logisticians is projected to grow 7 percent from 2018 to 2028, about as fast as average compared to all occupations.

job search

Projected Employment

No Data Available

Projected Employment Rankings For Virginia:

  • 7.7%

    Percent Change

    Ranks #29 in job growth rate
  • 870

    Annual Projected Job Openings

    Ranks #9 in net job growth

Select Type of Degree:

Typical College Majors

Majors that prepare Logisticians:

Indicates your preferred majors

★ Number of granted degrees for degree type, Masters degree, is listed after the major.

Education Level

  • Doctorate or Professional Degree (0.6%)
  • Master's degree (10.8%)
  • Bachelor's degree (33%)
  • Associate's degree (13.8%)
  • Some college, no degree (22.1%)
  • High school diploma equivalent (16.8%)
  • Less than high school diploma (2.9%)

Percent of workers in this field

Colleges that Prepare

Sort By:

Colleges per page

Sort By:

Colleges per page

Looking for colleges that offer a specific major? Use the College Match Tool to find your best-matched schools and discover your estimated Net Price!

job search

Skills

People in this career often have these skills:

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
View more
job search

Knowledge

People in this career often know a lot about:

  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
View more
job search

Abilities

People in this career often have talent in:

  • Oral Comprehension - The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Written Comprehension - The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Oral Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Problem Sensitivity - The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Deductive Reasoning - The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Inductive Reasoning - The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
View more
job search

Activities: what you might do in a day

People in this career often do these activities:

  • Develop business relationships.
  • Supervise employees.
  • Prepare proposal documents.
  • Analyze logistics processes.
  • Allocate physical resources within organizations.
  • Present business-related information to audiences.
View more

This page includes data from:

O*NET OnLine Career data: O*NET 26.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (“USDOL/ETA”). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA

Occupation statistics: USDOL U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment Statistics

careeronestop logo Videos: CareerOneStop, USDOL/ETA and the Minnesota Department of Employment & Economic Development

College Raptor loading bar
College Raptor Loading Screen College Raptor Loading Screen