Carpenters

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What do they do?

Construct, erect, install, or repair structures and fixtures made of wood and comparable materials, such as concrete forms; building frameworks, including partitions, joists, studding, and rafters; and wood stairways, window and door frames, and hardwood floors. May also install cabinets, siding, drywall, and batt or roll insulation. Includes brattice builders who build doors or brattices (ventilation walls or partitions) in underground passageways.

Also known as:

Assembler, Bridge Carpenter, Bridge Repair Crew Person, Cabinet Maker, Carpenter, Concrete Carpenter, Construction Worker, Form Carpenter, Framer, Rough Carpenter

Typical Wages

Annual wages for Carpenters in United States

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Projected Growth Rate

Employment of Carpenters is projected to grow 12 percent from 2018 to 2028, faster than average compared to all occupations.

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Projected Employment

No Data Available

Projected Employment Rankings For Virginia:

  • 12.9%

    Percent Change

    Ranks #13 in job growth rate
  • 2,940

    Annual Projected Job Openings

    Ranks #19 in net job growth

Education Level

  • Doctorate or Professional Degree (0.3%)
  • Master's degree (0.8%)
  • Bachelor's degree (6.3%)
  • Associate's degree (5.6%)
  • Some college, no degree (19.1%)
  • High school diploma equivalent (42%)
  • Less than high school diploma (25.8%)

Percent of workers in this field

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Knowledge

People in this career often know a lot about:

  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
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Abilities

People in this career often have talent in:

  • Manual Dexterity - The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Problem Sensitivity - The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing that there is a problem.
  • Visualization - The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.
  • Trunk Strength - The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without "giving out" or fatiguing.
  • Near Vision - The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Oral Comprehension - The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
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Activities: what you might do in a day

People in this career often do these activities:

  • Clean work sites.
  • Review blueprints or specifications to determine work requirements.
  • Measure materials or objects for installation or assembly.
  • Mark reference points on construction materials.
  • Cut wood components for installation.
  • Install building fixtures.
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This page includes data from:

O*NET OnLine Career data: O*NET 26.1 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (“USDOL/ETA”). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA

Occupation statistics: USDOL U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment Statistics

careeronestop logo Videos: CareerOneStop, USDOL/ETA and the Minnesota Department of Employment & Economic Development

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