Source: Pixabay user StockSnap.

Source: Pixabay user StockSnap.

If you’re hoping to apply to college, you may be trying to decide which standardized test to take: the ACT or the SAT. Each test has its own pros and cons, and some students perform better on one over the other. But which test is taken more popular?

ACT vs SAT: popularity among students

Nationally, the SAT and ACT have been about equally popular for several years. Since the SAT is an older test, it used to be considered the tried-and-true standard. But in 2012, the ACT was actually taken by a few thousand more students than the SAT (1,666,017 vs 1,664,479)—and its edge has continued to grow.

Interestingly, where you live in the US determines which test you’re statistically more likely to take. The ACT is much more popular in the Midwest than the SAT is. Which isn’t surprising, considering many states in that region require each student take the ACT as part of statewide assessments. This could change, though, as some states switch from mandatory ACT testing to SAT testing.

On the East and West Coasts, the SAT still predominates as the test of choice. But the ACT has gained footing in these areas as well.

Test preference among colleges

A common myth is that elite colleges look more favorably upon SAT than ACT scores. In reality, all colleges and universities which require standardized testing accept BOTH the ACT and SAT. And college admissions counselors have openly stated they do not prefer one test over the other.

It is also sometimes argued that, while colleges don’t admit to preferring the SAT, the fact that many more students accepted to competitive colleges submit the SAT than ACT seems to indicate there is a bias.

However, this bias also seems to be related to the region in which a college is located. For instance, according to College Navigator, 83 percent of students admitted to Harvard submitted SAT scores, while 35 percent submitted ACT scores. Similarly, 86 percent of Stanford admits submitted SAT scores and 39 percent ACT.

On the other hand, of students admitted to the University of Chicago, 66 percent submitted SAT scores and 53 percent ACT scores. Numbers are very similar for students accepted to Northwestern University.

Since students are likely to attend colleges within 170 miles to their homes, it makes sense that students admitted to a certain college would have been more likely to take the test popular in the region of their college.

Final considerations

The popularity of either test, nationally or in your region, shouldn’t be the determining factor when you choose which to take. To decide, first consider what is available to you. Will you have to take the SAT or ACT for state testing purposes? Even if you will, you may choose to take the other test in addition to the one that’s required.

Also consider what sorts of study resources are available to you. If you’ll be studying for one of the tests as part of your curriculum, you may be better prepared for one over the other.

Perhaps most importantly, take a practice ACT and SAT and see which one you prefer. Both offer a unique different testing style, and many students prefer one over the other.