What do they do?

Operate industrial trucks or tractors equipped to move materials around a warehouse, storage yard, factory, construction site, or similar location.

Also known as:

Checker Loader, Fork Lift Technician, Fork Truck Driver, Forklift Driver, Forklift Operator, Industrial Truck Operator, Lift Truck Operator, Shag Truck Driver, Spotter Driver, Tow Motor Operator, Tractor Driver, Truck Driver, Warehouse Driver

Typical Wages

Projected Growth Rate

Employment of Industrial Truck and Tractor Operators is projected to grow 20 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than average compared to all occupations.

Projected Employment in VA

No Data Available
  • 20.2%

    Change

    Ranks #17 in job growth rate
    2,080

    Job Openings

    Ranks #15 in net job growth

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Education Level

Percent of workers in this field with these degrees:

  • Doctorate or Professional Degree  (<1%)
  • Master's degree  (<1%)
  • Bachelor's degree  (4%)
  • Associate's degree  (5%)
  • Some college, no degree  (20%)
  • High school diploma equivalent  (52%)
  • Less than high school diploma  (19%)

People in this career often have these skills:

  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.

People in this career often have talent in:

  • Control Precision - The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
  • Multilimb Coordination - The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
  • Far Vision - The ability to see details at a distance.
  • Response Orientation - The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
  • Manual Dexterity - The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Rate Control - The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.

People in this career often do these activities:

  • Operate cranes, hoists, or other moving or lifting equipment.
  • Operate vehicles or material-moving equipment.
  • Load shipments, belongings, or materials.
  • Secure cargo.
  • Position material handling equipment.
  • Communicate with others to coordinate material handling or movement.
  • Inspect cargo areas for cleanliness or condition.
  • Move materials, equipment, or supplies.
  • Mark materials or objects for identification.
  • Weigh materials to ensure compliance with specifications.
  • Clean vehicles or vehicle components.
  • Maintain vehicles in good working condition.
  • Operate packing or other material processing equipment.
  • Install parts, assemblies, or attachments in transportation or material handling equipment.

This page includes data from:

O*NET OnLine Career data: O*NET 28.1 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (“USDOL/ETA”). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Logo Occupation statistics: USDOL U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment Statistics

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