Commercial Divers

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What do they do?

Work below surface of water, using scuba gear to inspect, repair, remove, or install equipment and structures. May use a variety of power and hand tools, such as drills, sledgehammers, torches, and welding equipment. May conduct tests or experiments, rig explosives, or photograph structures or marine life.

Also known as:

Commercial Diver, Dive Superintendent, Dive Supervisor, Diver, Diver Tender, Diving Supervisor, Hard Hat Diver, Non Destructive Testing Under Water Welder (NDT U/W Welder), Salvage Diver, Tender

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Projected Growth Rate

Employment of Commercial Divers is projected to grow 7 percent from 2018 to 2028, about as fast as average compared to all occupations.

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Projected Employment

No Data Available

Projected Employment Rankings For All United States:

  • 7.5%

    Percent Change

    Select a state to see its job growth rate ranking
  • 500

    Annual Projected Job Openings

    Select a state to see its net job growth ranking

Select Type of Degree:

Typical College Majors

Majors that prepare Commercial Divers:

Indicates your preferred majors

★ Number of granted degrees for degree type, All, is listed after the major.

Education Level

  • Doctorate or Professional Degree (0.2%)
  • Master's degree (1.5%)
  • Bachelor's degree (9.8%)
  • Associate's degree (10%)
  • Some college, no degree (26.3%)
  • High school diploma equivalent (39.8%)
  • Less than high school diploma (12.3%)

Percent of workers in this field

★ You’re seeing education information for Commercial divers(1) because we don’t have information for Commercial Divers. Please note the information may not be the same for both occupations.

Colleges that Prepare

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Skills

People in this career often have these skills:

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
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Knowledge

People in this career often know a lot about:

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
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Abilities

People in this career often have talent in:

  • Oral Comprehension - The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Oral Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Problem Sensitivity - The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness - The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Control Precision - The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
  • Multilimb Coordination - The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
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Activities: what you might do in a day

People in this career often do these activities:

  • Monitor work areas or procedures to ensure compliance with safety procedures.
  • Clean equipment, parts, or tools to repair or maintain them in good working order.
  • Maintain work equipment or machinery.
  • Communicate with coworkers to coordinate installations or repairs.
  • Gather information about work conditions or locations.
  • Train others in operational procedures.
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This page includes data from:

O*NET OnLine Career data: O*NET 24.3 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (“USDOL/ETA”). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA

Occupation statistics: USDOL U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment Statistics

careeronestop logo Videos: CareerOneStop, USDOL/ETA and the Minnesota Department of Employment & Economic Development

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