Need More Time for the SAT? Here’s How to Apply for Accommodations

Source: Flickr user stevendepolo.

Source: Flickr user stevendepolo.

When submitting a request for testing accommodations through College Board, if approved, the accommodations are good for not only the SAT, but also the PSAT 10, PSAT/NMSQT, and all AP exams.

You should submit the application at the beginning of your high school career, or the fall of sophomore year at the latest if you’re planning on taking the PSAT 10. The approval for accommodations is good for a whole year after your high school graduation date, so you don’t have to worry about it expiring between the PSAT 10 and your last AP exam of senior year.

What you should not do is wait until the last minute to decide you’d like to have extra time on the test. According to College Board’s website, the approval process for accommodations can take up to 7 weeks.

Eligibility

In order to be eligible for testing accommodations for the SAT, a request must be approved by SSD (Services for Students with Disabillities).

Those who have requests approved typically have a documented disability that would have an impact on the student’s ability to participate in a College Board exam. In addition, students, in most cases, will already be receiving these accommodations on school tests. The accommodation must be something that corresponds with the student’s disability.

For example, if you are a student who has an IEP for a learning disability and you receive extra time on tests at school, chances are pretty good that, with proper documentation, you can have extra time on the SAT as well.

On the other hand, if you are a student with a 504 plan because you have ADHD and you don’t have extra time written in as an accommodation on your 504, you probably won’t get approved for extra time on the SAT.

Again, these are just examples, if you believe you are in need of accommodations, submit a request.  

Submitting Your Request

The simplest way to submit an application for accommodations is to work with your school. Chances are your high school has their own SSD Coordinator, if not, your school counselor is also a handy resource (they might even be the same person).

Documentation of a disability is required in order to receive accommodations. Records of this nature are usually kept in the file with a student’s IEP or 504 plan. Most other required materials can be found in your cumulative file, which makes your school office a one-stop-shop.

Schedule a meeting with your school counselor to discuss your options. They are able to submit everything online through a streamlined process, which makes everything easier for you. For more information see College Board’s Top Five Reasons to Work with Your School.  

Note: This might also be something to discuss at your yearly IEP/504 meeting if you foresee yourself needing accommodations in the future.

Forms

The request-initiation forms (i.e., parent consent, teacher survey, and requests for temporary conditions) can be obtained here.

Forms for requests to change accommodations can also be found via the link above.

If you need any assistance, contact information for the College Board SSD Program can be found at the bottom of that same page.

Katelyn McAdam

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